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«NILE BASIN INITIATIVE Initiative du Bassin du Nil Information Products for Nile Basin Water Resources Management The ...»

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txt” referred to in the above screen; the file can be opened and viewed by Windows Explorer or any other software capable of reading ASCII text format. In the following case the respective Output File is opened using the View utility of the PC208W 3.3 software.

–  –  –

This concludes the user activities in Report with respect to the extraction of 5-minute rainfall time series data from the respective raw data input file downloaded from storage module.

For ease of reference, the above-presented steps are listed in Annex 3.

5.3.2.3 Hourly Meteorological Time Series As in the previous, the procedure for extraction of hourly meteorological time series data is similar to the one described in paragraph 5.3.3. The reader is referred to the above text and Annex 3 for detailed instructions on step 1 to 5 keeping in mind that in this case the parameter file “methour.par” should be used.

Steps 6 and 7 are discussed in more detail in the remaining part of this paragraph, even though these steps are also essentially analog to the ones discussed in paragraphs 5.3.3.

Step C1-5: Perform the same actions as presented in the previous paragraph. But now use parameter file “methour.par”.

Step C6: In the File name text box of the Select Output File sub-screen, type in the name of the output file. Apply the following naming format: methrXX.txt Make sure that the “XX” – serial number of the output file – is the same as of the respective raw input data file. For instance “methr31.txt” if originating from “data031.dat”. Click OK. This process is presented in the below window.

–  –  –

Step C7: Complete the routine by selecting Go from the Run menu. The results, as displayed on screen during the

programme run-time, are similar to window given below:

–  –  –

For each full hour the Met station has been operational, the following hourly meteorological data are extracted from raw input data file: station datalogger-ID, year, date and time, average hourly air temperature, vapor pressure, vapor pressure deficit and wind speed; and total hourly solar radiation. The first four values (i.e. ID, year, date and time) guarantee unique identification of each array.

The associated output file is in comma separated ASCII format. This is shown below for the output file “metrn31.

txt” referred to in the above screen; the file can be opened and viewed by Windows Explorer or any other software capable of reading ASCII text format. In the following case the respective Output File is opened using the View utility of the PC208W 3.3 software.

This concludes the user activities in Report with respect to the hourly meteorological data series.

5.3.2.4 Daily Meteorological Time Series Compilation of daily meteorological information is a similar process as the one described in paragraph 5.3.3 and 5.3.4. The reader is referred to this text, and Annex 3, for detailed instructions on steps 1 to 5. In this particular case the parameter file “metday.par” should be used.

Steps 6 and 7 are discussed in more detail in the remaining part of this paragraph, although all these steps are essentially analog to the ones discussed in paragraph 5.3.3.

Step C1-5: Perform the same actions as presented in the previous paragraph. Use parameter file “metday.par”.

Step C6: In the File name text box of the Selected Output File sub-screen, type in the name of the output file. Apply the following naming format: metdayXX.txt Make sure that the “XX” – serial number of the output file – is the same as of the respective raw data file. For instance, give the name “metday31.txt” to the output file if it is being extracted from “data031.dat”. Click OK. This

process is presented in the below given window:

–  –  –

Step C7: Complete the routine by selecting Go from the Run menu. The results, as displayed on the computer

screen during the programme run-time, are similar to the window given below:

–  –  –

For each day the Met station has been operational, the following daily meteorological data are extracted from the respective raw input data file: station datalogger-ID, year and date, average, maximum and minimum daily air temperature, average vapor pressure and vapor pressure deficit; total daily rainfall and solar radiation; average daily wind speed and direction and standard deviation of the wind direction. The first three indices (i.e. ID, year and date) uniquely identify each output array.

The associated output file is in comma separated ASCII format. This is shown below for the output file “metday31.

txt” referred to in the previous screen; the file can be opened and viewed by Windows Explorer or any other software capable of reading ASCII text format. In the following case the respective Output File is opened using the View utility of the PC208W 3.3 software.

The first three parameters uniquely identify each output array.

This concludes the user activities in Report with respect to the daily meteorological information.

5.3.2.5 Meteorological Station Performance Information As already indicated earlier, the METSTAT datalogger programme includes routines for permanent monitoring of the two essential station performance indicators, namely (a) battery voltage and (b) the signature of the active METSTAT datalogger programme.





Detailed instructions to retrieve and evaluate these two indicators are straight forward and by following essentially the same procedures as described above in the paragraphs 5.3.3, 5.3.4 and 5.3.5 – taking care to use the parameter file “metperf.par” instead. For users easy reference these instructions are summarized in Annex 5 of the Manual.

It is strongly recommended to assess performance of the meteorological station after each data retrieval exercise.

This will facilitate timely action in case of malfunctioning of the power supply unit at the station (solar panel and/ or battery) or corruption of the METSTAT datalogger programme, thus avoiding unnecessary loss of valuable meteorological data measured at the station.

Manual 37 PC208W Datalogger Support Software

There is no need to archive the output file containing the station performance information. After assessment of the station performance indicators (which will lead to a decision to either take or not take an action) this information can be printed out for records and the respective file deleted thereafter.

5.3.2.6 Renaming Meteorological Output Files Once the 5-minute rainfall, hourly and daily meteorological data time series data have been extracted and stored in the output files, a consideration should be given to suitably rename them. This may be important in particular when a large number of raw data files (containing measurements from more than one station, as may be the case in Uganda) is downloaded from storage module to PC and processed at the same time; this operation will unavoidably result in a large number of output files of the type “metrnXX.txt”, “methrXX.txt” and “metdayXX.txt” without a possibility to really know to which particular meteorological station these output files refer to, as it is not visible from their names.

To suitably rename the meteorological output files so as to enable the user to figure out both the type of data and the station the data have come from, by merely reading the output file name, the following simple procedure can be

used:

• immediately after processing the particular raw input file and thus creating an output file of the type “metrnXX.

txt”, “methrXX.txt” and “metdayXX.txt”, activate Windows Explorer and then open and view the respective output file (for example, open the file “metday31.txt”).

• take note of the Station Datalogger ID while viewing the file, and from this ID identify the station datalogger the viewed data are coming from (as an example, let’s assume it was established that the extracted data in the output file “metday31.txt” are referring to daily meteorological data observed at the Meteorological Station Kadenge established at the Kenyan part of the Nile Basin).

• Close the respective file (“metday31.txt” in our case).

• Highlight the same file again in the Windows Explorer, click the right mouse button and select “Rename” option in the menu that will show up on the screen.

• Move cursor to the beginning of the file name and type in a three letter prefix which will uniquely define the station, without changing/deleting any part of the old output file name (in our example, add say KAD prefix at the beginning of the file “metday31.txt” so that the renamed file reads: “KAD_metday31.txt”.

• Click the left mouse button anywhere in the Windows Explorer area to complete the operation and repeat the whole above sequence for all other output files.

From a renamed output file the user can now easily identify all the necessary information as follows: (a) what is the station the data have come from (from three-letter prefix, “KAD” in our example signifying the Kadenge Met station);

(b) what type of station is in question (from the next group of three characters, “met” in our example signifying the meteorological station); (c) what type of data are stored in the file (from the next group of three or two characters, “day” in our example so the file contains daily meteorological time series data); and (d) what is the name of the raw data file the output data have been extracted from (from the last two characters containing a serial number, in our example “31” denoting that the output file has been extracted from the raw data input file “data031.dat”).

–  –  –

Final Processing in MS Access and Final Storage into the NBD

6.1 General Final destination of the meteorological data obtained from the Automatic Weather Stations in The Nile Basin Monitoring Network is the NBD: The Nile Basin Database developed in MS Access. But prior to reaching the final step of adding newly observed data to this database, one more intermediate operation has to be performed: importing the ASCII files generated by Report (as described in chapter 5 of this Manual) into MS Access and restructuring them into a final NBD format.

Figure 5 shows the remaining part of the data trajectory, i.e. the preprocessing actions in MS Access.

–  –  –

Figure 5: Final data processing steps in MS Access and subsequent removal and storage of raw files as backups.

The following paragraphs will present the detailed instructions for performing the tasks indicated in the above figure.

6.2 MS Access Database “NBD_NEW DATA” The remaining data processing activities are carried out in an MS Access database file called “NBD_PreProcessing.

mdb”. The users will find this file in one of the following folders (given with full path name), depending on the country

and this file structure is required to be kept unchanged at all times:

• Users in Kenya: C:\MyDbase\NBD NEW DATA\Kenya Preprocessing • Users in Rwanda: C:\MyDbase\NBD NEW DATA\Rwanda Preprocessing • Users in Uganda: C:\MyDbase\NBD NEW DATA\Uganda Preprocessing

–  –  –

This database file (NBD_Pre Processing.mdb) contains several pre-defined objects including 4 tables and 3 process-append queries. The database tables and queries names are listed in table 4 together with a brief description of their function.

As indicated by their numbering, the various database objects listed in table 4 are divided into three different groups.

• Group 1 consists of 3 auxiliary tables in which to import the respective comma separated ASCII files generated

in Report (see chapter 5).

• Group 2 consists of a single ID-converter table used to convert into a final station identification code in accordance with either the Hydromet coding system or the one which is in force in each country of the Nile Basin.

• Group 3 consists of 3 process-append database queries specifically designed to generate records in the final NBD database format from data in the respective auxiliary table in Group 1 and to automatically append these records into the appropriate file and table of the NBD database.

–  –  –

The final NBD tables in which the processed data will ultimately be stored/appended are located in the following

database files (including the whole folder/directory path):

NBD tables (a) “AWS Meteo _Daily Data” (b) “AWS Meteo _Hourly Data” and (c) “AWS Meteo _5minRain Data” are

located in:

• C:\MyDbase\NBD\Daily Hydro-Meteorological Data\Daily Clim Kenya.mdb – for data observed at the meteorological stations in Kenya (for the time being there is only one such station established by the Project) • C:\MyDbase\NBD\Daily Hydro-Meteorological Data\Daily Clim Rwanda.mdb – for data observed at the meteorological stations in Rwanda (there is only one such station).

• C:\MyDbase\NBD\Daily Hydro-Meteorological Data\Daily Clim Uganda.mdb – for data observed at the meteorological stations in Uganda (there are three such stations established by the previous project and 2 more by the present project in Uganda).

The above paths (folder/directory structure) are included into the respective pre-designed MS Access queries indicated in table 4 and should not be changed by the user as any change of the folder/directory structure will result in loss of the processed data.

The individual database items in a particular object group are subject to similar final processing. For example,

–  –  –

the actions for importing ASCII text file “metdayXX.txt” into MS Access are equivalent to those for “methrXX.txt” and “metrnXX.txt”, only table and file names differ. The same applies for running the various queries and adding the fully processed data to the NBD.

It is because of this fact, and the wish to avoid redundancy, that this manual presents the detailed user instructions for only one member of each data type. The instructions for the remaining members are analog.



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